Complete 2014 Projections

Position: All | Batters | Pitchers | C | 1B | 2B | 3B | SS | 2B/SS | 1B/3B | IF | LF | CF | RF | OF | DH | SP | RP
     
PROJECTED 2014 SEASON STATS
1. Ryan Braun, Mil OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics2253093827564.298.372.498.869
2014 Projections5788930986113218.273.347.503.850
2014 Outlook: After chiseling a Rookie of the Year award (2007), an MVP (2011), five Silver Sluggers (2008-12) and three top-10 finishes on our Player Rater (second in 2012, third in 2011 and seventh in 2009) onto his career résumé, it all came crashing down for Braun in 2013, as he accepted a 65-game, season-ending suspension for violations of baseball's Basic Agreement and its Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. Fantasy owners tend to be quick to judge; they might harshly deflate Braun's draft stock assuming that his post-suspension self might be significantly less in ability. But what right do we have to decide what he did, when he did it and what specific effect it had? Braun, before 2013, had showed an unparalleled combination of hit-for-average, hit-for-power and base-stealing ability, and his critics shouldn't instantly assume he can't again flash .300-hitting, 30/20 skills. He is now more of a guess because of the suspension as well as the thumb injury that cost him 36 games, but fantasy owners -- in any league regardless of format -- shouldn't allow him to slip too far beyond their first round or so, because of what he showed us from 2007-12. Stephania Bell: Braun has been on the verge of extended injury absence several times, but his first DL stint wasn't until 2013, the same year in which he served a suspension for PED use. Could this be when he starts to break down?
2. Yasiel Puig, LAD OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics382661942369711.319.391.534.925
2014 Projections5608826765514317.288.363.498.861
2014 Outlook: Few players enjoyed as immediate a big league splash as Puig; he batted .436 with seven home runs and 16 RBIs in 26 games during his debut month of June 2013, his numbers ranking among the greatest of any player during a debut month in history. Even after opposing pitchers familiarized themselves with his free-swinging ways, however, Puig continued to thrive, batting .284 with 12 home runs in his next 88 games (playoffs included), a testament to his immense talent. He's not a player without questions: His aggressive approach could lead to streakiness and liability in walks/on-base percentage leagues, not to mention make him more susceptible to injury than an average player, and, occasionally, he has lapses in judgment. Still, Puig's ceiling is as high as anyone's, especially in traditional Rotisserie scoring, in which he makes a compelling case to be one of the first 25 names off the board.
3. Alex Rios, Tex OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics6168318814110842.278.324.432.756
2014 Projections609831877339830.273.312.442.753
2014 Outlook: Once considered one of the more unpredictable fantasy performers, Rios has developed into a remarkably reliable power/speed player: His .278/18/79 per-162-games career rates were spot-on to his .278/18/81 numbers in 2013. The primary difference was his speed: He swiped a career-high 42 bases, 16 of those coming in the 47 games he played following his Aug. 9 trade to the Texas Rangers. Still, even if he regresses on the basepaths at the age of 33, he's a potential 20/20 player who is one of only six in the majors with at least 150 apiece in homers and steals in the past eight seasons combined. This is an early-round Rotisserie performer, one whose only true weakness is a lack of walks; unless your league gives those hefty weight, he's a clear selection in the first four rounds.
4. Giancarlo Stanton, Mia OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics425622462741401.249.365.480.845
2014 Projections508813991791674.270.373.567.940
2014 Outlook: Stanton is one of the most powerful hitters in baseball: Since the date of his major league debut in 2010, he has hit the fourth-most homers (117), has the second-highest home run/fly ball percentage (24.3) and the ninth-longest average home run distance (411.7 feet). In addition, historically speaking, the 117 homers are 10th most among any player before his 24th birthday; his .535 slugging percentage through his age-23 season is also 11th best among those with 2,000-plus plate appearances. However, Stanton still falls short of "elite" status -- those with a legitimate stake at first-round status -- because of a checkered injury history at a young age: He has missed 101 of 590 career games, including for foot, shoulder, oblique, knee and hamstring issues. He also suffers somewhat in terms of quality pitches to hit as well as his counting numbers (runs, RBIs) due to his status as a heart-of-the-order hitter for one of the game's weakest lineups, though, in his defense, Stanton's per-game numbers have been quite good. He's a player who could become that superstar/MVP-caliber performer scouts long predicted as he enters his prime, but bear in mind the injury track record. Stephania Bell: He spent six weeks on the DL in 2013 with a hamstring injury and despite being just 24 years old, Stanton's games played have declined progressively the past two years. Can he reverse the trend?
5. Justin Upton, Atl OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics558942770751618.263.354.464.818
2014 Projections5717827917414915.271.359.473.832
2014 Outlook: His was a tale of two seasons. Upton batted .286/.404/.629 with 13 home runs through his first 40 games for the Atlanta Braves, looking like a surefire MVP candidate after years of such career prognostications but then hit just .256/.335/.409 with 14 home runs in his next 109 games, looking more like a league-average right fielder. (Hey, at least he wasn't the worst Upton.) Justin showed little skills improvement during his "cooling" stage, tempering some of those lofty career expectations as he enters his age-26 season. That said, he's still a player who has flashed occasional MVP talent, and one who, again, at 26, is entering the prime of his career. Could this be the season? Perhaps, but it's no longer worth spending that first-round pick to find out.
6. Jay Bruce, Cin OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics6268930109631857.262.329.478.807
2014 Projections5988931105641678.259.331.485.816
2014 Outlook: A power-hitting left-handed bat in a perfect park for that type, Bruce has hit at least 30 home runs in three consecutive seasons, one of only three players who can claim that (Miguel Cabrera and Adrian Beltre are the others). At the same time, Bruce's game has almost entirely moved toward power; this has resulted in rising strikeout rates every year since 2009 and a propensity for streakiness. To the latter point, he batted .246 with one homer in his first 34 games of 2013, .307 with 17 in his next 41. Bruce's power places him in the class of early-round fantasy picks, but his strikeouts are a concern in points leagues, and those who select him need to be patient through his rough patches.
7. Jose Bautista, Tor OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics45282287369847.259.358.498.856
2014 Projections50791338787976.266.375.509.884
2014 Outlook: One of the best raw power hitters in baseball -- his 152 home runs since the beginning of 2010 trail only Miguel Cabrera's 156, and they are 26 more than third place in the category during that span -- Bautista has fallen somewhat into injury-risk territory recently, having appeared in only 210 games combined the past two seasons because of wrist, back, ankle and hip issues. His 2013 represented his second consecutive year ended prematurely in August, this time because of a bone bruise in his hip, though all reports on his health during the winter were positive. Bautista's skills might be slowly declining, understandable for a 33-year-old, but he's still capable of approaching 40 home runs at the expense of a middling batting average; his on-base and slugging percentages, however, should remain good. He's an early-round pick in traditional rotisserie leagues, and a more attractive one, albeit with risk, in more sabermetric scoring formats. Stephania Bell: Bautista recovered nicely from wrist surgery a year ago but ended his 2013 season early with a bone bruise in his hip. He was healed by November and enters the spring healthy.
8. Allen Craig, StL 1B, OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics508711397401002.315.373.457.830
2014 Projections518851996411004.309.364.485.848
2014 Outlook: Craig is much more of a risk/reward hitter than fantasy owners give him credit for. Consider that his 134 games played in 2013 represented a career high; he has appeared in only 67.8 percent of the St. Louis Cardinals' scheduled games (playoffs included) in his big-league career, making four trips to the DL in four years. Still, despite his injuries, Craig has the 10th-best batting average (.311) and 17th-most RBIs (189) the past two seasons combined, showing how productive a hitter he is when he takes the field. The RBIs might have been somewhat fluky; keep in mind that the Cardinals managed the highest batting average with runners in scoring position of any team in history, and Craig himself plated 24 percent of his runners on base, tops in the majors. His health might also remain in question as a regular outfielder; he's expected to move to right field to clear first base for Matt Adams. Craig's ceiling is awfully high and he's more reliable (when healthy) than Adams, but be prepared with a contingency plan for the likelihood he misses additional time in 2014. Stephania Bell: Craig suffered a Lisfranc injury while rounding first base last September but was able to avoid offseason surgery. He expects to be a full participant this spring although the key will be how well he's running.
9. Ben Zobrist, TB 2B, SS, OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics612771271729111.275.354.402.756
2014 Projections6149116828310114.282.369.440.808
2014 Outlook: Zobrist is a fantasy darling for a variety of reasons: Most obvious is that he qualifies at three different positions in leagues with a 20-game requirement, including the critical middle-infield spots (second base and shortstop) to go along with the outfield. But he's also a category filler with additional value in walks and on-base percentage leagues; he is the only player in baseball to have at least 75 home runs, 75 stolen bases and 400 walks in the past five seasons combined, with his annual averages tallying 18/17 with 86 walks and a .366 on-base percentage during that time. Despite his declining homer and steal numbers in 2013, he is one of the more attractive early-to-mid rounders based upon the flexibility alone.
10. Hunter Pence, SF OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics6299127995211522.283.339.483.822
2014 Projections6238622915112510.274.331.446.778
2014 Outlook: Knock Pence for his unconventional style of hitting; he has defied his critics for years, serving as one of the most consistently underrated players in the game. He is one of only four players to have managed at least 20 home runs, 90 RBIs and 80 runs scored in each of the past four seasons, and in 2013, he was one of only eight 20/20 performers, he and Mike Trout the only ones of those eight to also manage at least a .280 batting average and 90 runs and RBIs apiece. Pence did this by vastly improving his contact rate, and his aggressiveness on the base paths became his path to rejoining fantasy's elite. He might not look the part of a rotisserie-league building block, and his numbers aren't quite those of a top-25 overall pick. But he's also not a far cry from it.
11. Wil Myers, TB OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics33550135333915.293.354.478.831
2014 Projections604812591671719.267.340.457.797
2014 Outlook: The American League's reigning Rookie of the Year, Myers has long been considered one of the game's best power-hitting prospects, and his chances of a major breakthrough in terms of homers are good entering 2014. As a rookie, he possessed balanced splits -- he hit .292 against righties, .293 against lefties -- and between the majors and minors he belted 27 home runs. If there's a concern, it's his strikeout rate, as he whiffed 24.4 percent of the time, plus struggled to make consistent contact against breaking pitches. Myers' .293 batting average is probably unsustainable, and he might be susceptible to streaks as he fully adapts. Still, he's a possible 30-homer hitter this year, and his upside in the category makes him one of the most attractive investments in dynasty leagues.
12. Jason Heyward, Atl OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics38267143848732.254.349.427.776
2014 Projections5629322716912613.269.356.452.808
2014 Outlook: Hey Jason, we're waiting for that breakout ... A 2007 first-rounder, and Keith Law's No. 1 prospect entering his rookie year of 2010, Heyward has yet to become that MVP-caliber talent many predicted during his minor league days. Injuries have held him back: He made two trips to the DL last season alone, and has missed 17.9 percent of Atlanta Braves games during his four-year career. Heyward's BABIPs, not to mention his steals totals, have been all over the map, meaning that those speculating on his statistical ceiling need to brace themselves for inconsistency. Still, he's 24 years old, made huge strides in terms of his contact rate last season (80.9 percent, up from 74.1 in 2012), and has averaged 22 homers and 13 steals per 162 games played thus far to illustrate his power/speed potential. Don't let Heyward slip too far in your draft, as he's plenty capable at making a run at the top 25 fantasy players overall in any future year. An aside: For category counters, be aware that the Braves plan to bat him leadoff, meaning he's more likely to have a higher runs than RBI total.
13. Carlos Beltran, NYY OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics55479248438902.296.339.491.830
2014 Projections545892681501023.281.341.486.827
2014 Outlook: One of the most successful hitters in postseason history -- he's a .333/.445/.683 career hitter with 16 home runs in 51 such games -- Beltran signed this winter with a team everyone annually assumes is playoff-bound: The New York Yankees. But before you pencil them in again and dream up wild Beltran expectations, remember that the 2013 squad fell short and Beltran, like many of his fellow Yankees, is getting up there in years; he turns 37 in April. He's no longer the base-stealing threat he was during his prime, and his numbers from the right side of the plate have tumbled, though Yankee Stadium coupled with occasional time in the DH spot to ease some of the physical strain might help slow his aging curve. As a middle-of-the-order hitter, Beltran's numbers come season's end might not look much different than they did in 2013. But he's a player with greater odds of regression than progression in 2014.
14. Mark Trumbo, Ari 1B, OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics6208534100541845.234.294.453.747
2014 Projections523733392411445.252.308.501.809
2014 Outlook: If such a thing as a "first-half player" exists -- it's a notion that has been largely overstated during the 30-plus-year history of Rotisserie baseball -- Trumbo would top the list of candidates. Through three big-league seasons, he has hit 60 of his 95 home runs before the All-Star break, his batting average 41 points higher before (.268) than after (.227) it and his slugging percentage 107 points higher before (.517) than after (.410) it. Tuck that away if you're the lucky owner to secure his draft-day rights; ads for your Trumbo sale should run during every commercial break by mid-June. That said, he's still a remarkably powerful slugger, and one surrendering Angel Stadium for the more hitting-conducive dimensions of Chase Field, meaning a fourth consecutive season of setting new personal bests in home runs is possible. To be clear: No double coupons, and no deep Black Friday discounts. (OK, maybe we'll allow it in leagues that penalize for strikeouts or use on-base percentage.)
15. Jayson Werth, Wsh OFYEARABRHRRBIBBKSBAVGOBPSLGOPS
2013 Statistics4628425826010110.318.398.532.931
2014 Projections538842477691218.277.362.468.831
2014 Outlook: Don't let the constant criticism of his bloated contract dissuade you from drafting Werth, as, despite an up-and-down three seasons with the Washington Nationals, he has averaged .277/23/77 numbers with 17 stolen bases per 162 games played. His 2013 was particularly productive: He set a career high with his .318 batting average and finished the season with .339/.432/.600 second-half numbers, including 15 home runs in 65 games. Werth's speed has been in decline for a couple of years, and he has missed enough time in his Nationals career to be of concern in the injury department -- there's a reason they signed Nate McLouth as their fourth outfielder -- but he's also a solid early-to-mid round pick with upside in leagues that use on-base percentage.